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You are Here: Home -> Forums -> Health/Care -> egg eating

Topic: egg eating (6 messages)

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egg eating (6 messages)
Posted By Message Posted On Report

McMurray Hatchery
My hens are eating their eggs. Are they lacking something in their diet? How can I get them to stop?
5/11/2012 9:04 AM report abuse
Robert D Seals
Score: 19
Try putting in some fake eggs (or golf balls).
5/22/2012 7:57 PM report abuse
misspeggsue
Score: 15
You can also poke holes in the ends of an egg, blow the insides out and fill it with hot sauce or mustard. They won't like the taste of that!
6/5/2012 3:46 PM report abuse
CHERYLS
Score: 7
Keep your nesting boxes dark so the hens can't see well and line them with shavings or straw to keep the eggs from being knocked around and broken. Collect eggs as soon as possible after they are laid to remove the temptation. Sometimes a hen that doesn't have sufficient calcium will lay thinner shelled eggs that break easily and this will teach the hens to eat eggs. Separate hens with this problem and supplement their calcium until their egg shells get stronger. It may be due to boredom. Let them free range or give them a new treat like sunflower seeds or a head of cabbage and see if that helps.
6/21/2012 8:03 PM report abuse
SWENB
Score: 11
We are a working 40 acre farm that currently has 300 hens and more roosters, temporarily growing with the hatches. We hatch and purchase Mcmurray hatchery every year.
We also have goats, hogs, horses, collies, rhodesian ridgebacks, guinea fowl, pheasants, peafowl, geese, ducks, turkeys, and anything else you can think of.
I highly agree to Cheryls. If you do that, you should be all set.
7/26/2012 8:12 PM report abuse
PJC
Score: 0
Egg yolks and whole eggs store meaningful amounts of protein and choline, and are generally used in cookery. Due to their protein content, the United States Department of Farming categorizes eggs as Foods within the Food Guide Pyramid.
11/17/2016 6:04 AM report abuse